ALL OUR FLOURISHING IS MUTUAL (BREAD AND HONEY) By Diane Borsato - Fall Season Opening

ALL OUR FLOURISHING IS MUTUAL
(FREE BREAD AND HONEY TASTING)

By Diane Borsato

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21. THE DRAKE HOTEL, 7-9PM

With Toronto area urban beekeepers Kuldip Jassal, Melanie Coates, Brian Hamlin, Tom Nolan and Sonia Rojas, Diane and Mario Borsato paired with chefs from Boralia, Mattachione, Actinolite, OMG Goodness, and Blackbird Bakery. 

Alongside the Fall Season launch of TRAFFICKING, an artist multiple by Ed Pien.

Curated by Su-Ying Lee

ALL OUR FLOURISHING IS MUTAL is a work by Diane Borsato created for MMMMM...Gendai Kitchen and part of 86's, a series of Monday night tasting events at The Drake Hotel organized by chef Ivy Knight. 

Secreted across borders by those who can't imagine life ahead without them, seeds and plant cuttings hold a promise to convey a taste of "home". Plants migrate around the globe through natural processes and human intervention. Ed Pien's TRAFFICKING pouched have been conceived of to facilitate the journey. TRAFFICKING directly references stories of Chinese migrants and refugees who would sew hidden compartments into their clothing to conceal valuables.

Countless varieties of edible plants rely on the transcendence of elements to become fruitful - seeds, pollinators, and a vehicle such as wind, animal, or human intercession. The taste of home carried through honey or food plants are in reality, a taste of home - makers and cooks. This is because, around the world, our food-systems are largely globalized. Meanwhile, our demand for the crops that we have come to think of as native may be the course of impending crisis. Either though hive colony collapse disorder of the epidemic of bee deaths in recent years, is thought to be caused by migratory bee keeping: the moving of colonies from one locality to another to create more honey flows and to pollinate orchards and fields. This practice is seen to transmit disease among bees. Ed Pien and Diane Borsato both tap into our profound attachment to certain foods and the comfort they bring all the while, complicating our desires to modern agricultural practices and human agency. 
 

 
Emily Fitzpatrick